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Author Previous Topic: The Gallery: Dec. 2018 Modeling Year In Review Topic Next Topic: The Gallery: Nov. 18 Interior Decoration Pt. 3
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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/29/2012 :  10:33:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
From my observation/experience in the Northeast (PA through New England): Stone foundations tend to date a structure before 1880. Brick would be common 1880s-1920s. Concrete block or poured concrete dates from the 1930s.

These are rules of thumb, not absolute constraints. But I've had very good luck in dating structures with this rule. (And once I even "beat" my father in the house we ended up buying. I said the stone foundation indicated the house was older than he thought. I was proven right when we found literally "writing on the wall" that provided a date, apparently a teenager kept a diary on the wall's plaster before it was painted. This was quite a 'victory' for me, since my father was a structural Civil Engineer.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7169 Go to Top of Page

OldGuy
Section Hand



Posted - 03/15/2012 :  3:38:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cole Camp Mo is a DPM paradise. After traveling through it for 40+ years, a detour led me past this little jewel - http://www.flickr.com/photos/76153558@N02/6985430185/in/photostream/

Bob Dye

Country: USA | Posts: 93 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/15/2012 :  3:55:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OG, that is indeed a neat structure and a great addition to the thread.

The incorporation of local stone into a building is quite common around here (one of the glaciers from the ice age dumped an abundance of stone in the area). It is good to see that you can find similar uses of local stone elsewhere.



Country: USA | Posts: 30822 Go to Top of Page

OldGuy
Section Hand



Posted - 03/15/2012 :  6:39:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

OG, that is indeed a neat structure and a great addition to the thread.

The incorporation of local stone into a building is quite common around here (one of the glaciers from the ice age dumped an abundance of stone in the area). It is good to see that you can find similar uses of local stone elsewhere.



The one thing we don't lack is rock. Can't really farm the land. Ya can grow hay and cattle, but very little crop goods.


Bob Dye

Country: USA | Posts: 93 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 09/04/2012 :  5:55:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We came across this odd little structure while exploring around cottage country.
This past weekend up in Northern Ontario Canada.
It seems to be called the "Green Bass" hunting camp,from the name painted on the front door.
I thought it had the potential to inspire a model, so I took a few photo's.























Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 7768 Go to Top of Page

dti406
Engine Wiper



Posted - 09/06/2012 :  1:19:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


This is the abandoned ice house in Washington Court House, OH. The tracks are from both the B&O and DT&I. This reinforced concrete structure was built sometime after the Tornado of 1885 which wiped out this part of town completely. To the right there used to be a refrigerator plant that made the ice and the old warehouse office was the next structure to the north.

Rick J



Country: USA | Posts: 389 Go to Top of Page

mabloodhound
Fireman



Posted - 09/06/2012 :  3:17:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Interesting concrete building. Looks like one of the first attempts at a reinforced concrete building. Even pilasters on the outside for support.


Dave Mason
D&G RR (Dunstead & Granford) in On30
“Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.”~Benjamin Franklin
The 2nd Amendment, America’s 1st Homeland Security

Country: USA | Posts: 6652 Go to Top of Page

Oliver W. Jr.
Engine Wiper



Posted - 09/07/2012 :  12:00:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit Oliver W. Jr.'s Homepage  Reply with Quote
Modeling the spalled rebars on that icehouse would be an interesting challenge.


Country: | Posts: 269 Go to Top of Page

Cowboybilly
Crew Chief

Posted - 09/07/2012 :  4:39:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
i like it


Country: Germany | Posts: 782 Go to Top of Page

eTraxx
Fireman



Posted - 09/07/2012 :  5:19:11 PM  Show Profile  Visit eTraxx's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I think I was told that someone, sometime, someplace produced a model of this commercially. Since I can't remember .. suppose it doesn't matter. :)









Then .. a Mirror Image of the thing





.. and a montage ..

I started to create a Sketchup file of this .. need to finish it.



Country: USA | Posts: 2998 Go to Top of Page

mabloodhound
Fireman



Posted - 09/07/2012 :  5:35:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Interesting buildings Ed. The small size reminds me of some of the smokehouses in Virginia but the steep roof is reminiscent of the Mount Vernon kitchen, albeit somewhat smaller.
I bet the roofer on the second photo didn't know he cold get longer sheets of roofing (or else he forget to measure twice).

Any history/location on these?



Dave Mason
D&G RR (Dunstead & Granford) in On30
“Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.”~Benjamin Franklin
The 2nd Amendment, America’s 1st Homeland Security

Country: USA | Posts: 6652 Go to Top of Page

Chuck Doan
Fireman

Posted - 09/07/2012 :  5:47:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Typical cottage style gas stations with additions. Several brands used these. Pure and Phillps 66 I think were two of them.


Country: USA | Posts: 1559 Go to Top of Page

mabloodhound
Fireman



Posted - 09/08/2012 :  09:27:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ah, yes, Chuck. I see the gas pump bases in the 2nd photo now.

Dave Mason
D&G RR (Dunstead & Granford) in On30
“Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.”~Benjamin Franklin
The 2nd Amendment, America’s 1st Homeland Security

Country: USA | Posts: 6652 Go to Top of Page

Chuck Doan
Fireman

Posted - 11/06/2012 :  10:44:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A great prototype country store/gas station:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/universalpops/sets/72157631802025873/with/8101356987/



Country: USA | Posts: 1559 Go to Top of Page

Chuck Doan
Fireman

Posted - 05/30/2013 :  12:07:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A nice country store with different sidings to try. An ideal subject for a simple scratch building project.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jsrice00/8884351965/



Country: USA | Posts: 1559 Go to Top of Page
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