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 Prototype Structures That Cry Out To Be Modeled-3
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Author Previous Topic: The Gallery: Dec. 2018 Modeling Year In Review Topic Next Topic: The Gallery: Nov. 18 Interior Decoration Pt. 3
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Chuck Doan
Fireman

Posted - 05/27/2011 :  3:11:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is some rusty metal clapboard siding. Never saw that before...


http://www.flickr.com/photos/auvet/5752621997/in/pool-485968@N20









Country: USA | Posts: 1559 Go to Top of Page

DaveInTheHat
Engine Wiper



Posted - 05/27/2011 :  5:58:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit DaveInTheHat's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I remember when I was a kid there were tobacco barns that were built sort of like that in southern Maryland.

http://www.fotki.com/daveinthehat
http://www.youtube.com/user/daveinthehat/videos

Country: USA | Posts: 273 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/14/2011 :  1:03:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Remember, John L. Sullivan? He was a bare-knuckle boxer, around 1849ish, and his training headquarters are located in Belfast, N.Y. Could make an interesting model.

I have more photo's of this to add later.
Rich




Country: USA | Posts: 3589 Go to Top of Page

cprfan
Engine Wiper



Posted - 10/16/2011 :  5:53:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Sticking with the house theme, here is one that caught my eye. Kind of like the house that Jack built (or was it Brian Nolan?)






Hi Bruce !, new reply to a old post, but that's quite a house, would make for a good structure build...

Alan


--

Country: Canada | Posts: 146 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/28/2012 :  08:51:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Alan, sorry that I missed this back in the fall. My friend and fellow moderator George has done the plans for me, and I have some NEBrownstone castings for that foundation. If the good Lord gives me enough time, I will model it.


Country: USA | Posts: 30823 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/28/2012 :  09:04:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yesterday we were out in Honesdale, PA for a wake and ran across this abandoned structure. It sits between railroad tracks (the Erie Railroad's old Wyoming division) and a good size stream (river?).

Not the best day or time of day for these shots, but that is when I was there.

This is the track side of the building. I think that is novelty siding.



I guess that the siding on the back of the smaller addition has been replaced as some point.



The water side, with the sun in the lens.



The 'interesting side'. You can see the odd angle on the right front corner of the building.







Country: USA | Posts: 30823 Go to Top of Page

jatravia
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/28/2012 :  09:25:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce, that is an interesting corner on that building. Any thoughts on why they did that? I can't tell from your photos - did the track possibly run along that corner?

Joe <><



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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/28/2012 :  10:02:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A lot of character in that old building, including nail holes.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14620 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/28/2012 :  10:10:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by George D

A lot of character in that old building, including nail holes.



I will keep this one handy for those who don't think we should model nail holes, George.

Joe, it is always tough to figure these things out. The building is very close to the river (I now know that it is the Lackawaxen River). Did they angle it to give loading access on that side? There is a new bridge very close to the building now, but was the old bridge further away, giving more land room by that angled wall? The D&H canal ran near here, too. I'm not sure of the actual location near this building. Notice the door up on the second floor of that angled wall, too. Many questions.




Country: USA | Posts: 30823 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/28/2012 :  11:10:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce, any chance you could post a sketch of the site? I'm still a bit confused by this. (a) Did this building have rail? If so, on what side? (b) Could this have been a mill or something associated with the river? (Or did the tracks run between the building and the river?)

(Good thing you saw this in Feb, you wouldn't be able to see anywhere near as much with leaves on the trees.)

A connection with the D&H Canal is possible, I probably have something somewhere that shows the canal layout. Can you also post the address so we can look at this on Google Maps or Bing? Another possibility would be if the building sat on a (42", if I remember right) Gravity Railroad line between the building and the river.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7169 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/28/2012 :  11:32:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Here is another shot.



I believe that the street name is Brown Street. Right across the street is the Honesdale Agway. The tracks next to the building is/was part of the tourist operation called the Stourbridge Railroad. The engine house for that operation is right next to the building, too.

http://local.yahoo.com/info-93070186-stourbridge-railroad-company-honesdale;_ylt=AnygnHmX6JKPiZLC08WG5ICKNcIF;_ylv=3?viewtype=map

If you zoom in on this map, and scroll a bit south, you will see where Brown Street crosses the river. The building is right at the bridge.




Country: USA | Posts: 30823 Go to Top of Page

jatravia
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/28/2012 :  11:54:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This http://www.historicaerials.com/aerials.php?scale=4E-06&lat=41.5627488002262&lon=-75.2480237246898&year=1969 seems to be the right location but 1969 is the oldest photo the site has and it doesn't explain much.

Also I tried Bing Maps http://www.bing.com/maps/?v=2&where1=23%204TH%20St%2C%20Honesdale%2C%20PA%2018431&q=23%204th%20St%2C%20%23100%2C%20Honesdale%2C%20PA%2018431&form=LMLTSN&cp=41.56262355791656~-75.2485826611518&lvl=18&sty=h&encType=1
which I normally have good success with but in this case the "birds eye" view didn't reveal much. Bing is normally the 1st place I go.

I idea that it may have been angled for easy loading access from the road seems feasable. I like puzzels like this - I don't have as good an eye for it as I'd like to think though. Interesting.

Joe <><



Country: USA | Posts: 2831 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/28/2012 :  1:23:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I dug out my copy of "Coal Boats to Tidewater". From what I'm seeing of the map at Honesdale (pg 57), the canal ran on the other side of the Lackawaxen River from the structure in question. There's a building marked on the map on the other side of the river from this building, labeled "Ward & Co Storehouse". Any idea what was used for the foundation of this building? If it's stone (rather than brick), that would most likely make it 19th century. A brick foundation on this would in my guess date it from late 19th to early 20th century.

edit The map shows a gravity line spur running on the correct side of the river towards this building, but that looks like it runs on the line that the Erie took.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 02/28/2012 1:27:10 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7169 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/28/2012 :  1:51:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking on Google Maps, you can project a spur from either side of the existing trackage:

(This is fun to look at while on a boring telecon at work :-)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7169 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/29/2012 :  09:52:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, I don't recall the type of foundation that it has and it doesn't show in the pictures.

I love the top down view.



Country: USA | Posts: 30823 Go to Top of Page
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