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PRR N6B cabin car.

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Topic:


Topic author: INRAIL
Subject: PRR N6B cabin car.
Posted on: 09/20/2010 12:12:18 AM
Message:

Here are four pictures of my Walther's N6B PRR cabin I just finished weathering. I plan on using a couple of these on my PRR South Bend Branch.

Tom Johnson







Replies:


Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 09/20/2010 06:49:02 AM
Message:

What a great caboose, Tom! [:-thumbu] I particularly like the streaking off from the lettering. How did you get that terrific truck color?


Reply author: akimmons
Replied on: 09/20/2010 07:28:27 AM
Message:

Beautiful work, Tom!
Can you give us some details on your techniques? I agree with slimrails, the trucks are excellent, and so is the subtle variations in color on the sides.


Reply author: Neil M
Replied on: 09/20/2010 08:42:35 AM
Message:

I like the paint job you did on that

The variation between the different boards is really nice, especially from a distance


Reply author: MarkF
Replied on: 09/20/2010 10:41:49 AM
Message:

Great looking model Tom! I agree with everyone else - the weathering is fantastic, especially the trucks.


Reply author: postalkarl
Replied on: 09/20/2010 11:17:15 AM
Message:

Hi Tom:

Very nicely done indeed.

Karl S.


Reply author: bxcarmike
Replied on: 09/20/2010 3:21:35 PM
Message:

Tom,great job,all it needs are a set of carmer cut levers. mike h.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/21/2010 01:05:27 AM
Message:

Thanks Mike for the suggestion of the cut levers. I can't believe I overlooked them. What are "carmer" cut levers BTW? The trucks were quite simple. I air brushed them with a Floquil Roof Brown and Grimy Black mix. About two thirds brown to one third grimy. While the paint was still tacky, I scrubbed in some AIM dark earth chalk mixed with some dark rust. I then lightly sprayed them with Testor's Dullcote.

Arnold. I first air brushed the cabin with Floquil (solvent based) Rail Tie Brown. I then wiped it off with a Q-tip swab soaked with an odorless turpentine called turpenoid. This stuff works great. It won't remove the factory paint or lettering but will remove Floquil solvent based paint. Don't scrub hard. It will come off with vertical strokes with the Q-tip. Jim Six uses this Q-tip method but he used water based paints instead of solvent based. When you're done, you'll see some of the Rail Tie Brown left behind in streaks that give some of the individual boards a different shade of brown. It also leaves a dark color in the grooves. At this point, you can leave it as is if you want a car not heavily weathered and in fairly good shape. I decided to follow a photo I have and painted several individual boards different shades of brown (a lighter faded brown and a dark shade of brown) along with some gray and dark gray using a very small brush. I thin these colors a bit so they don't completely cover the original color and letters. I'll do some blending with oils that I scrubbed out into a rag and dry brush on the side with a stiff brush to tone it down some. What color of oil? Sort of a faded brown. The brush had very little paint in it. I then cleaned the white letters off with a small brush and turpenoid. I've noticed that many of these heavily weathered cabins still had very white letters for some reason. I coated the cabin with Dullcote and then added some white oil paint on the bottoms of the white letters and smeared them down with a small stiff brush. I air brushed the under frame with the same color I painted the trucks with. I air brushed the roof with the same mix but with a bit more grimy black. I did some dry brushing with oils on the roof and coated it with Dullcote. The stove pipe was painted with a galvanized color of Floquil silver mixed with some white. This is a great galvanized color I learned from Larry Swanson in Lafayette, IN. The black weathering on the stove pipe was done with oil paint. The entire cabin was Dullcoted again. That's about it. Hope this makes sense. Oh, I also see where I need to scrape off that mold parting line on the brake cylinder. Man can you find things in photo's! ;o)

Tom Johnson


Reply author: bitlerisvj
Replied on: 09/21/2010 11:34:42 AM
Message:

Initially, I was going to say that Pennsy Cabin cars didn't use carmer cut-lever, but I was looking at the N5 series, steel cars. I finally found some decent photos of the N6 series and sure enough they do look like Carmer cut levers. I have personally made my own out .012 brass rod/wire, but you can also purchase etched brass ones.
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/modeling/new%20products/freest/carcut-rtecrdmain.html
Regards, Vic Bitleris

quote:
Originally posted by prrvandalia

Thanks Mike for the suggestion of the cut levers. I can't believe I overlooked them. What are "carmer" cut levers BTW? The trucks were quite simple. I air brushed them with a Floquil Roof Brown and Grimy Black mix. About two thirds brown to one third grimy. While the paint was still tacky, I scrubbed in some AIM dark earth chalk mixed with some dark rust. I then lightly sprayed them with Testor's Dullcote.

Arnold. I first air brushed the cabin with Floquil (solvent based) Rail Tie Brown. I then wiped it off with a Q-tip swab soaked with an odorless turpentine called turpenoid. This stuff works great. It won't remove the factory paint or lettering but will remove Floquil solvent based paint. Don't scrub hard. It will come off with vertical strokes with the Q-tip. Jim Six uses this Q-tip method but he used water based paints instead of solvent based. When you're done, you'll see some of the Rail Tie Brown left behind in streaks that give some of the individual boards a different shade of brown. It also leaves a dark color in the grooves. At this point, you can leave it as is if you want a car not heavily weathered and in fairly good shape. I decided to follow a photo I have and painted several individual boards different shades of brown (a lighter faded brown and a dark shade of brown) along with some gray and dark gray using a very small brush. I thin these colors a bit so they don't completely cover the original color and letters. I'll do some blending with oils that I scrubbed out into a rag and dry brush on the side with a stiff brush to tone it down some. What color of oil? Sort of a faded brown. The brush had very little paint in it. I then cleaned the white letters off with a small brush and turpenoid. I've noticed that many of these heavily weathered cabins still had very white letters for some reason. I coated the cabin with Dullcote and then added some white oil paint on the bottoms of the white letters and smeared them down with a small stiff brush. I air brushed the under frame with the same color I painted the trucks with. I air brushed the roof with the same mix but with a bit more grimy black. I did some dry brushing with oils on the roof and coated it with Dullcote. The stove pipe was painted with a galvanized color of Floquil silver mixed with some white. This is a great galvanized color I learned from Larry Swanson in Lafayette, IN. The black weathering on the stove pipe was done with oil paint. The entire cabin was Dullcoted again. That's about it. Hope this makes sense. Oh, I also see where I need to scrape off that mold parting line on the brake cylinder. Man can you find things in photo's! ;o)

Tom Johnson


Reply author: bxcarmike
Replied on: 09/21/2010 5:34:45 PM
Message:

Looks like Vic beat me to it. Take a look on fallenflags scroll down towards bottom of freight cars section there's a good shot of the end of one on a offset coupla'd one, but they both look like they use a carmer or something close to it. mike h.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/21/2010 7:24:24 PM
Message:

Yes, I also discovered those photos on fallen flags. I'm looking into the site Vic gave me or I'll make my own out of styrene. Did you also notice the one with plywood sides? Interesting. That would make a great kitbash.

Tom Johnson


Reply author: bxcarmike
Replied on: 09/21/2010 7:28:15 PM
Message:

Yes, I wonder if you could cut.010 styrene sheets down, glue them on, and do one? mike h.


Reply author: crabster
Replied on: 09/22/2010 1:52:38 PM
Message:

Great work Tom!!

I think you finally outdid yourself with this one!

While the trucks look darn good, I think the real star of the show is the cabin itself! The weathering is just.... WOW! [:-bigeyes]
And when compared to the stock model http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/932-7653 The WOW factor becomes tenfold.

This has to be one of Walthers finest cars yet. And it is correct to boot!


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/22/2010 6:55:30 PM
Message:

OK, here is a revised photo after a couple of changes. I added the carmer cut lever and corrected the mold seam line on the brake cylinder. I scratch built the cut lever from styrene. It's not perfect but good enough IMO. I never received an email from that link suggested earlier on the carmer cut lever. Typical I guess. It seems like any time an email address is used to order something, responses are either not prompt or you get non at all. I'll just make my own from styrene.

Tom Johnson


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/22/2010 7:10:11 PM
Message:

Anton, thanks for the kind words. Yes, it was interesting that the trucks got a lot of the attention. I spent a lot of time painting and weathering almost every individual board on that cabin! Phew!!!

Tom Johnson


Reply author: bitlerisvj
Replied on: 09/23/2010 12:22:23 PM
Message:

It just keeps getting better and better. I really love what you did with this already very nice cabin car. I need to print these photos out for futire reference. I have a couple of Quality Craft N6B kits under construction, but currently deferred due to building the layout. Later on when I need a break, I will go back to building those kits. I love the craftsman kits, but the new Walthers cars are really nice.
Thanks and regards, Vic Bitleris

quote:
Originally posted by prrvandalia

OK, here is a revised photo after a couple of changes. I added the carmer cut lever and corrected the mold seam line on the brake cylinder. I scratch built the cut lever from styrene. It's not perfect but good enough IMO. I never received an email from that link suggested earlier on the carmer cut lever. Typical I guess. It seems like any time an email address is used to order something, responses are either not prompt or you get non at all. I'll just make my own from styrene.

Tom Johnson




Reply author: bxcarmike
Replied on: 09/23/2010 5:16:17 PM
Message:

Tom, looks great, nice job on cut levers, they look good. I like the coloring of the stack. mike h.


Reply author: INRAIL
Replied on: 09/28/2010 10:16:34 PM
Message:

Mike. I've had a lot of off list email comments about the stove pipe. I used silver (any Floquil solvent silver will work) mixed with some white to create the galvanized silver that looks like its been hot a few times. I learned about this color mix from Larry Swanson in Lafayette, IN., several years ago. It works!

Tom Johnson


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